What happens at the end of a reverse mortgage? Mar 9th

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When you get a reverse mortgage, you tap the equity in your home without having to sell it. There are several advantages to having a reverse mortgage, for those who qualify: For one, you gain access to part of the cash value of your home, increasing your liquidity. Setup and legal fees are rolled into the loan amount, and aren’t due until the end of the mortgage (be aware that interest will accrue). And you can remain in your home without having to make monthly loan repayments, as you would with a home equity line of credit or a standard mortgage—so your monthly expenses will not increase as a result. (This article shares additional details and can help you decide if a reverse mortgage is right for you.)
But what happens at the end of a reverse mortgage? A common myth is that the lender can take your home when the loan is due; that isn’t the case. Let’s look at what actually happens.
Three common ways for a reverse mortgage to end
A reverse mortgage usually ends in one of three ways: either the homeowners die; they sell their property and move away; or they move into a retirement residence or long-term care…

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