“Where do we pay income tax if we retire abroad?” Apr 27th

Retirement planning getting you down? There are always smart ways to plan the financial aspects of your retirement.
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Q. We’re thinking about moving to Mexico full-time when we retire. Where would we pay income tax on our monthly Canadian pensions?
–Marianna
A. Many Canadians dream of a retirement that includes travel abroad. Some even move abroad part of the year, most of the year, or give up their Canadian residency entirely. 
In the case of Mexico, Marianna, a taxpayer is considered a resident of Mexico if they have a permanent home available to them in Mexico. If they have homes in both Mexico and Canada, the location of their centre of vital interests—their personal and economic ties—must be considered. 
The courts typically refer to the residence article of the OECD Model Tax Convention when defining centre of vital interests:
“If the individual has a permanent home in both Contracting States, it is necessary to look at the facts in order to ascertain with which of the two States his personal and economic relations are closer. Thus, regard will be had to his family and social relations, his occupations, his political, cultural, or other activities, his place of business, the place from which he administers his property, etc…

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