TFSA vs RRSP: How to decide between the two Jun 28th

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One of the most common questions out there is whether to invest in a registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) or a tax-free savings account (TFSA). Both will help you save, and save on taxes, but each works in different ways. Understanding these investments will help you know when to use one or the other—and when you can use both in tandem.
What is a TFSA?
First introduced to Canadians in 2009, the TFSA has proven to be very popular. Each year, you get an allotment of $6,000 available for your TFSA, which means that you can put that amount away, plus any rollover from previous years (assuming you were 18 or older in 2009, you have a lifetime limit of $69,500 as of 2020). This money has already been taxed—you contribute to a TFSA from your net income—so there’s no tax break at the time of contribution. But any gains you earn in a TFSA—whether it’s from a savings account, a high-growth index fund or another investment product—aren’t subject to capital gains tax, so you won’t owe any tax on your earnings when you make a withdrawal…

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