OSFI Facing Growing Pressure to Tweak Stress Test + MORE Feb 7th

Obtaining a mortgage or secured line of credit in Canada at the best rates is often a daunting task. We can help! Read the articles below for more info.
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 property mortgage

Locked Out of the Market: How the Mortgage Stress Test Could Be Hurting Homebuyers Mar 12th

It was created with the intention of saving Canadians from becoming over-burdened with their mortgages, but some critics of the Canadian government’s mortgage stress test say it is slamming the door on first-time homebuyers who would otherwise be able to break into the market. In a recent opi.... More »

CMHC reports annual pace of housing starts slowed in February + MORE Mar 9th

The housing agency said Friday the annual pace of housing starts slowed in February as higher mortgage rates and other economic conditions soften demand. Economists had expected an annual pace of 205,000 for the month but instead fell to 173,153 units..... More »
 secure line of credit

National Housing Update: How the Real Estate Industry is Faring One Month into 2019 + MORE Feb 16th

Real estate news is typically quiet in January, but there’s been quite a few developments as of late. To quickly recap, Canadian real estate in 2018 ended with four consecutive months of sales declines. Overall, there was a drop of 11 per cent nationwide, with the 2.5 per cent drop from November .... More »
 home equity

Should You Apply For a Loan or Line of Credit? Apr 8th

Banks offer a variety of products to give you access to cash. But is every borrowing option the same? If you’re weighing the alternatives, you may struggle with the choice between a loan and line of credit. Only you can decide what’s best for you, but there are some factors to consider..... More »
Canada’s financial regulator is facing growing pressure to tweak its mortgage stress test, and no longer just from the mortgage industry. On Monday, Calgary city councillor George Chahal filed a motion asking for the mayor to call on the federal government to amend the stress test implemented by OSFI (the Office of the Superintendent of […]

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Q: My wife and I are both 40 and have two kids—ages 5 and 7. We are considering buying a joint last-to-die life insurance policy that would cost a fixed $7,105 per year for ten years. That’s a total of $71,050 and the policy would pay $500,000 when the last of us dies. This is a proposition from our advisor after we have made our retirement plan. We have concluded that we have enough savings to retire at 55 with a very comfortable nest egg made up of TFSAs, RRSPs, and defined benefit pension plans, as well as money in non-registered investments.
We do not have any debts except a remaining mortgage of $95,734. We also have life insurance and disability insurance with our employer that would cover our needs if one of us were to die or could not work anymore. The goal of this joint last-to-die policy would be to transfer money tax- free in the future as all other needs are covered either by our savings or our employee benefits.
I am wondering if buying this policy is really a good move and if the cost of this product is reasonable? We can afford the cost without changing our lifestyle but our advisor is not independent so the policy would be sold by its institution and that’s what makes me wary…

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Q. I recently got a call from my Kia dealer saying that my 2015 Optima is a popular secondhand car. They want to meet to offer me a great price for the car and a discount on the purchase of a new one with 0% financing. My car has just 32,000 kilometres and it’s fully paid.
I wasn’t looking to change, but I thought that if I could get enough money for it, I would buy a new Optima, and then I would have some money handy. (We are renovating our house and cash is tight.) I intend to go and see what they will offer me. Is this something you recommend or not?
— Thanks, Jack in Montreal
A. You would be better off using a line of credit or some sort of equity loan if you have any borrowing ability left instead of taking on additional auto debt—even if you will be able to pay it off slowly at zero interest. Selling a new car after four years, especially Kia, Hyundai or Fiat-Chrysler models that depreciate quickly, is an expensive proposition. You will lose about 60% of what you paid originally…

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