What to know about mortgages from alternative lenders + MORE Mar 25th

Canadian housing mortgage rates are all over the map. Don’t get trapped in an unnecessarily costly mortgage agreement.
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Banks cutting variable mortgage rates to drum up business even as fixed rates rise + MORE May 18th

A number of Canadian lenders have slashed their variable mortgage rates in recent days, even as some of those same lenders are raising their fixed-rate mortgages..... More »
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Mortgage risks fading thanks to higher rates, tougher rules, says Bank of Canada report Nov 15th

The lofty levels of household debt has been a key concern for the Bank of Canada as it gradually raises its trend-setting interest rate, which it has already hiked five times since the summer of 2017..... More »

Lender Insights from the 2018 National Mortgage Conference Nov 3rd

Mortgage professionals from across Canada descended on Montreal last weekend for the annual National Mortgage Conference. Hosted by Mortgage Professionals Canada, the annual gathering was once again well attended, with about 1,200 participants and 60+ exhibitors at the Exhibitor Expo. The two-day ev.... More »

The Latest in Mortgage News – The Stats Are In Apr 30th

There have been a number of reports released over the past few weeks that have provided some interesting insight into the state of the housing and mortgage markets. New reports have touched on everything from 2018 renewal rates, foreign buyer statistics and credit quality to the latest financial cru.... More »
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Royal Bank cuts 5-year fixed mortgage rate, others likely to follow suit + MORE Jan 17th

Canada's biggest bank has cut its five-year fixed-term mortgage rate, a move other banks are likely to try to match in short order..... More »
TORONTO _ Samantha Brookes has been warning Canadians to take a close look at the clauses in their mortgage contracts for years, but her refrain has become a bit more prevalent in recent months.
Since the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions’ mortgage stress test was implemented in January, the founder of the Mortgages of Canada brokerage has seen “a huge influx” of Canadians who fail to qualify for a bank mortgage turning to alternative lenders that range from risky loan sharks to larger, more conventional companies like Home Trust.
While alternative lenders can provide a lifeline for Canadians who have run out of other financing options, Brookes said they come with pitfalls for those who don’t bother looking at the fine print.
“You need to read those contracts,” she said. “(With an alternative lender), the interest rates are higher, the qualifying rate is higher than if you were going with a traditional bank and they are going to charge one per cent of the mortgage amount (as a lender’s fee) for closing, so that means your closing costs increase…

Continue Reading On canadianbusiness.com »

TORONTO — Samantha Brookes has been warning Canadians to take a close look at the clauses in their mortgage contracts for years, but her refrain has become a bit more prevalent in recent months.
Since the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions’ mortgage stress test was implemented in January, the founder of the Mortgages of Canada brokerage has seen “a huge influx” of Canadians who fail to qualify for a bank mortgage turning to alternative lenders that range from risky loan sharks to larger, more conventional companies like Home Trust.
READ: Your mortgage is about to get more expensive
While alternative lenders can provide a lifeline for Canadians who have run out of other financing options, Brookes said they come with pitfalls for those who don’t bother looking at the fine print.
“You need to read those contracts,” she said. “(With an alternative lender), the interest rates are higher, the qualifying rate is higher than if you were going with a traditional bank and they are going to charge one per cent of the mortgage amount (as a lender’s fee) for closing, so that means your closing costs increase…

Continue Reading On moneysense.ca »

Should Pete sell mutual fund to pay down the mortgage?Shutterstock
Q. I have $103,490 left on my mortgage and I pay $325 bi-weekly on it @2.89% fixed rate (mortgage is being renewed shortly). I have the ability to pay off up to 15% ($18,700) of the original mortgage annually in a lump sum without fees. Should I pull money out of my mutual funds (averaging 7% annual return) to put down a lump payment? Or, keep everything as it is? I can also pay down up to double the required bi-weekly payment without charges also, so possibly increasing the biweekly payment would be better? Any advice?
Thanks, Pete
A. Pete, this is actually a common question. People want to know where their money will be most effective. You have had a low rate on your mortgage and even with renewal, it will remain relatively low. Meanwhile, your mutual funds are earning 7%.
Related: Paying down an income property
I do not recommend withdrawing from a higher earning investment to pay down a lower cost debt. That would not be effective and there may be other fees associated with that strategy including possible deferred sales charge fees or maybe taxes (if RRSP money is involved)…

Continue Reading On moneysense.ca »

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