Can Canadian seniors collect government benefits while still working? + MORE May 26th

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Can you make a transfer from an RESP to a spouse’s RRSP? Sep 1st

Q. I have an RESP account that I plan to wind down—and I have very little RRSP contribution room, but my wife has quite a lot. I just read this article you wrote for MoneySense about transferring money from an RESP to an RRSP. I thought it was permissible for a subscriber (that would be me in this.... More »

UFC Notebook: Cormier undecided on retirement after loss - TSN Aug 18th

UFC Notebook: Cormier undecided on retirement after loss  TSNLeading up to UFC 231, Daniel Cormier acknowledged that facing Stipe Miocic in a rematch for the UFC heavyweight title was a high risk proposition. With the ...View full coverage on Google News.... More »

How to avoid tax-payment nightmares when RRIF withdrawals start Sep 29th

One thing salaried employees take for granted is the automatic deduction of taxes “at source.” They receive their regular paycheque with “net” or after-tax deposits that go directly into their bank accounts. The consolation is that come tax time there should be no unpleasant surprises in the.... More »

Creating a will is the “adulting” milestone you need to hit this year Jul 21st

When it comes to self-improvement, most of us have a hard time with follow-through—and whether you stuck to your Keto diet or not, there are likely items on your financial to-do list that just never get crossed off. One of the easy actions to delay is creating a will. After all, no one wants to th.... More »
Q. This fall, I will celebrate my 65th birthday, and plan to reduce my work hours to three days a week, from my current full-time hours now. I also plan to begin collecting my Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security benefits—but, at the same time, I want to avoid being taxed on my income if possible. What would you suggest I do?
– Rose
A. From a lifestyle perspective, Rose, I think the phased retirement you’ve opted for is a great way to make the transition from full-time work. Not everyone has the option to go from full- to part-time, but if you can, it’s worth considering.
There is a common misconception that you can’t work while receiving your government pensions, or that there is some sort of reduction or clawback. You can, in fact, receive your Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension and your Old Age Security (OAS) pension while still working, but there are some important considerations.
You can start CPP as early as age 60; if you’re still working at that point, you need to keep contributing to CPP…

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Two of the more promising measures in the recent federal budget could pave the way for deferred annuities and pooled-risk pension products designed to prevent retirees from outliving their money.
The budget proposed two new types of annuities that can be used for registered plans. The headline-grabber was ALDA: an acronym for Advanced Life Deferred Annuity. As of 2020, ALDAs could become an investment option for those with registered plans like RRSPs or RRIFs, Defined Contribution (DC) Registered Pension Plans and Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPPs).
The other proposal is for Variable Payment Life Annuities (VPLAs), which would pool investment risk in groups of at least 10 people within defined-contribution RPPs and PRPPs. This, to me, rings of a relatively obscure academic concept called a “tontine,” which, in its most extreme form—famously depicted in The Wrong Box—pools investments by a group, with the single survivor “winning” the whole pot by outliving all the unfortunates who die sooner…

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Q. I have just turned 40, am single, and earn $86,000 a year. I also have zero debt. I just finished paying off my house, worth $315,000, and I would like to continue to put away my mortgage payment of $1,000 every two weeks as savings.
Because all money went to debt repayment, I’ve never really invested before, but I do have $20,000 in my RRSP that a family member manages for me. I also have a small amount in my TFSA. I will receive a pension upon retirement, but as I would like to retire early, I won’t receive the full amount, and the pension payments will not fully sustain my lifestyle. So some advice on how I should invest the $26,000 in annual disposable income would be appreciated.
– Mara
A. Despite your lack of investing experience, Mara, your instincts are right on target. Most of us don’t want financial independence, which can easily be achieved by selling everything we own and buying a hut in an impoverished country; we want to achieve and maintain our desired lifestyle…

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