Looking for reliable books and online resources on retirement? Here are a few + MORE Nov 4th

Not sure how to make a retirement plan? Read on…
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Q. Are there books or good self-help websites on retirement planning for Canadians that you can recommend? I live in Ontario and want to retire earlier than age 60 but I’m unsure how taxes will affect me when I can (and should) begin to draw down on my registered and non-registered savings. I’d also like to understand what I can do to maximize my after-tax retirement income. Any suggestions you have would be appreciated.
–Rob
A. This is a great question. There are so many sites in the web universe for online help and resources that it’s important to confirm the background and credentials of the information you are looking at.
Before you even begin, always check and make sure you are looking at Canadian sites because sometimes U.S. and U.K. sites have similar-sounding products and advice, but they work within a different regulatory framework in those countries. So those sites aren’t as helpful to you.
I would start with Canadian federal or provincial government websites that are unbiased and well researched…

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Q. I’m due to receive Old Age Security (OAS) benefits next year. I’m concerned because the dividends I receive from my investments will bring my income to $90,000, putting me in a situation where my OAS will be clawed back. Should I be selling some of my dividend stocks to stay below the threshold for clawbacks? I already pay more in income tax than I receive from my Canada Pension Plan benefits.
–Cam
A. Old Age Security (OAS) is a federal government pension payable to those age 65 and older. Unlike Canada Pension Plan (CPP), it is based on years of residency in Canada, and not work history or historical contributions. Those who have lived in Canada for at least 40 years since the age of 18 are entitled to the maximum of $613.53 per month at age 65 (as of the fourth quarter of 2019). That’s $7,363.36 annualized. 
OAS can be lower or higher than the standard maximum. Those with fewer than 40 years of residency may receive a prorated pension. Recipients can also defer their OAS pension past age 65 and start it as late as age 70…

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