TFSA vs RRSP: How to decide between the two + MORE Mar 30th

All about Retirement Planning in Canada. Learn the ins and outs and get the latest news.
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Can a LIRA be transferred to an RRSP with no contribution room in Ontario? Aug 10th

Can 50% of my LIRA be transferred to my RRSP if I do not have contribution room in Ontario Canada? Is it better to transfer to an RRSP or RRIF if funds are not needed and are used for investment purposes?—Katherine How much can you transfer from a LIRA to an RRSP? Katherine, Ontario resident.... More »

How much are withholding taxes on RRSPs and RRIFs? Jun 15th

I need to withdraw $6,600 from my RRIF over the next six months. This amount is in addition to my annual minimum. If I do the withdrawals in six monthly amounts of $1,100 (total of $6,600), will the tax withholding rate be 10% on each $1,100, or will it be a higher rate on the total $6,600 over the .... More »

The 60/40 portfolio: A phoenix or a dud for retirees? + MORE Oct 26th

For Canadian investors, one of the biggest shocks of 2022 is how poorly balanced mutual funds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and portfolios have performed. Investors with funds based on the classic pension fund asset allocation of 60% in stocks and 40% in bonds have been bewildered to experience loss.... More »

What’s my RRSP contribution limit for 2022? Nov 16th

If you’re like many Canadians, you’re hoping you’ve paid enough tax in 2022 and may even be looking forward to a hefty tax refund. (The deadline for filing this year is April 30, 2023, and since that date falls on a Sunday, you actually have until May 1, 2023 to file.) You can help ensure that.... More »
 registered retirement savings plan

What it’s like to work with a financial advisor + MORE Apr 6th

If you’re like many Canadians, you’re probably weighing working with a financial advisor. Maybe you’ve just gotten married, started a business, expanded your family or come into an inheritance, or you’re planning your financial future as you approach retirement. A financial advisor can be.... More »
One of the most common questions out there is whether to invest in a registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) or a tax-free savings account (TFSA). Both will help you save, and save on taxes, but each works in a different way. Understanding how these accounts work will help you decide which is best for your current needs—and even when to use them in tandem.
What is a TFSA?
A TFSA (or tax-free savings account) is a registered investment savings account that any Canadian resident, aged 18 or older, can use for straightforward savings or to hold investments. It can store things like exchange-traded funds (ETFs), guaranteed investment certificates (GICs), bonds, stocks and cash.
Any income earned in the account—even when it is withdrawn—is tax-free. This means any interest, stock dividends and capital gains earned in your TFSA aren’t subject to income tax. However, your TFSA contributions won’t reduce your taxable income like RRSP contributions will.
There’s a limit on the amount of money you can contribute to your TFSA is annually…

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I’m quitting. Should I keep my pension or take a lump-sum payout?It depends on your age and whether you’re good at managing your money, expert says.

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