Why the $35,000 RRSP Home Buyers’ Plan won’t be much help Mar 31st

Not sure how to make a retirement plan? Read on…
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An easy guide to income splitting for seniors Apr 14th

Q. My husband and I are both retired. He still has income from his business, and I have cashed in all of my RRSPs but one. My question is: Can Hubby cash one of his RRSPs (and pay taxes, of course), but then turn around and buy a spousal RRSP for me? Would that be worth doing? Then I could cash this.... More »

Avoiding future interest is one way to look at your return on investment May 12th

Q. I’m 47 years old and, after suffering a personal injury, have just been awarded a medical pension of $400 per month. The money is indexed annually and payable for life. I can opt for a cash-out and receive $120,000 upfront, but I’m unsure which is the smarter option. My mortgage renews in 202.... More »

Can Canadian seniors collect government benefits while still working? + MORE May 26th

Q. This fall, I will celebrate my 65th birthday, and plan to reduce my work hours to three days a week, from my current full-time hours now. I also plan to begin collecting my Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security benefits—but, at the same time, I want to avoid being taxed on my income if possi.... More »
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How will a pension buyback impact your income tax return? + MORE Apr 7th

Q. I plan to do a pension buyback for my service with the Government of Canada. Can I deduct the lump sum payment from my total income if I fully pay the amount at once? And will the total income reported on my T4 be reduced if I choose to deduct a certain amount from each pay stub? Looking forward .... More »
It’s been about a week since federal budget day and I still have questions about some of the things the government announced. For instance, why did they introduce a deferred annuity, which will allow Canadians to put 25% of their RRSP or RRIF into an annuity that must start paying out by 85 at the latest, instead of pushing back the RRIF withdrawal age limit? With more people working past 65, changing the withdrawal limit from 71 to, say, 75, would have allowed people to invest longer and then drawdown savings later in life when they really need it.
The biggest head-scratcher for me, though, was around the RRSP Home Buyers’ Plan. I still can’t figure out why the Liberals decided that letting first-time homebuyers withdraw $35,000 from their RRSP, which they still have to pay back over 15 years, instead of $25,000 is the answer to Canada’s housing problems. It seems to me that it only benefits professionals in Toronto and Vancouver who are already making good money and can afford a home whether they’re saving in their RRSP or not…

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