Women, here’s how to save more for retirement — or you’ll live to regret it + MORE Mar 2nd

Retirement planning getting you down? There are always smart ways to plan the financial aspects of your retirement.
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Maximizing spousal RRSP contributions in your 70s + MORE Mar 23rd

Q. My wife will turn 71 in 2022. She has three spousal RRSPs that we will arrange to mature on the same day: Feb. 8, 2022. On that day, we will convert all the RRSPs into a RRIF. Between now and then, I wish to take full advantage of my ability to continue making contributions to spousal RRSPs. I am.... More »

Marriage or mortgage: Which is the better investment? Mar 30th

Weddings can be expensive, but so can many of the things that come after a wedding—like a home purchase, starting a family and saving for retirement. And so money is an important relationship issue even before a couple ties the knot.  Both weddings and home purchases can both cause people to thin.... More »

What happens at the end of a reverse mortgage? Mar 9th

When you get a reverse mortgage, you tap the equity in your home without having to sell it. There are several advantages to having a reverse mortgage, for those who qualify: For one, you gain access to part of the cash value of your home, increasing your liquidity. Setup and legal fees are rolled in.... More »

Reality-testing your financial plan + MORE Mar 16th

Q. I am contemplating changing financial planners and I just met with one who seemed very impressive. Within about three hours he had everything laid out for me: the investments I should purchase, the use of life insurance, delaying CPP to 70 and more. Still, I would like to get a second opinion bef.... More »
Women, here’s how to save more for retirement — or you’ll live to regret itThe right adviser and the right habits can impose discipline, writes Lesley-Anne Scorgie.

Continue Reading On thestar.com »

A registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) is an investment that is registered with the Canadian federal government. RRSPs are often described as being “tax-advantaged.” That means you don’t pay income tax on the amount you are contributing to an RRSP, in the year you earn that contribution. However, you will have to pay income tax when you withdraw money during your retirement. The advantage is built on the assumption that your income is higher now than it will be in retirement. If you plan things right, you will be in a lower tax bracket in retirement, meaning that you pay less tax on your withdrawals than you saved initially by stashing your money inside an RRSP.
You can open an RRSP and contribute income up until the year you turn 71, at which point it has to become a registered retirement income fund (RRIF) and you begin to withdraw the money as taxable income. 
The best RRSP accounts  in Canada for 2021

Best RRSP savings account: EQ Bank RSP Savings Account* (2.30%)
Best robo-advisors: Questwealth Portfolio and Wealthsimple Invest
Best brokerage account for passive investing: Wealthsimple Trade
Best brokerage account for active traders: Questrade
Best brokerage account for mutual funds: Qtrade

Best RRSP savings account
EQ Bank RSP Savings Account*
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