An easy guide to income splitting for seniors Apr 14th

All about Retirement Planning in Canada. Learn the ins and outs and get the latest news.
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UFC Notebook: Cormier undecided on retirement after loss  TSNLeading up to UFC 231, Daniel Cormier acknowledged that facing Stipe Miocic in a rematch for the UFC heavyweight title was a high risk proposition. With the ...View full coverage on Google News.... More »

How to avoid tax-payment nightmares when RRIF withdrawals start Sep 29th

One thing salaried employees take for granted is the automatic deduction of taxes “at source.” They receive their regular paycheque with “net” or after-tax deposits that go directly into their bank accounts. The consolation is that come tax time there should be no unpleasant surprises in the.... More »

Can Canadian seniors collect government benefits while still working? + MORE May 26th

Q. This fall, I will celebrate my 65th birthday, and plan to reduce my work hours to three days a week, from my current full-time hours now. I also plan to begin collecting my Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security benefits—but, at the same time, I want to avoid being taxed on my income if possi.... More »

Can you make a transfer from an RESP to a spouse’s RRSP? Sep 1st

Q. I have an RESP account that I plan to wind down—and I have very little RRSP contribution room, but my wife has quite a lot. I just read this article you wrote for MoneySense about transferring money from an RESP to an RRSP. I thought it was permissible for a subscriber (that would be me in this.... More »
Q. My husband and I are both retired. He still has income from his business, and I have cashed in all of my RRSPs but one. My question is: Can Hubby cash one of his RRSPs (and pay taxes, of course), but then turn around and buy a spousal RRSP for me? Would that be worth doing? Then I could cash this spousal RRSP the following year.
— Cindy
A. Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions are tax-deductible and withdrawals are taxable. The right mix of contributions and withdrawals—and timing them both—are key.
If your husband takes an RRSP withdrawal of, say, $10,000, and then contributes $10,000 back to an RRSP, Cindy, there’s no net impact on his taxes. He’ll have $10,000 more income, and a $10,000 deduction to reduce that income. He doesn’t need to deduct the RRSP contribution in the year he contributes; a taxpayer can contribute, and then save the deduction for that contribution for a future yea. But in your example, it sounds as though he would contribute and deduct that RRSP contribution in the same year…

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