Bring back the $10,000 TFSA + MORE Oct 6th

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Estate planning considerations for single parents Nov 23rd

If you are a single parent, here are key questions you should consider: 1. Are your estate plan and related documents up to date? The death of a spouse or separation or divorce generally triggers a significant change in intentions on death. If you are widowed or if you no longer want your for.... More »

Housing market to slow in 2018 but prices to rise + MORE Dec 13th

TORONTO — New stricter mortgage rules are expected to slow the housing market next year, but prices are still expected to rise about five per cent, according to a report by Royal LePage. In its market survey forecast, the real estate firm says its house price composite, which measures prices in 53.... More »

Mother Nature proves less troublesome for Prairie farmers in 2017: report Dec 5th

REGINA _ A report from the Canadian Crop Hail Association says a reduction in potentially damaging storm activity on much of the Prairies this past summer led to one of the lightest hail-claim seasons in eight years. The 2017 report from the Regina-based association shows there were just over 8,600 .... More »
 renters insurance

On tax reform, Donald Trump gets it done—and takes a moment to gloat Dec 21st

U.S. President Donald Trump, flanked by Republican lawmakers, celebrates Congress passing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on the South Lawn of the White House on Dec. 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) You can’t spell “triumph” without T-R-U-M-P, and so here was the.... More »
 home owners insurance

No more mushy middle: 2018 will be the end of centrist politics + MORE Dec 1st

A Vote to Leave campaigner holds a placard as the leader of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP), Nigel Farage, campaigns for votes to leave the European Union in the referendum on May 25, 2016 in Bolton, England.(Christopher Furlong/Getty Images) The political left, especially in post-9/11 .... More »
OTTAWA — The national housing agency is exploring ways to make it easier for entrepreneurs and new immigrants to buy a home by cutting some of the red tape required to prove they can afford to pay the mortgage.
“Right now, under our mortgage insurance policies, you have to be able to document income to get mortgage insurance, to a level of specificity that discriminates against new Canadians, because they can’t do that,” Evan Siddall, the CEO of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., said in a wide-ranging interview with The Canadian Press.
READ: Should you use RRSPs to pay down the mortgage?
“It discriminates against entrepreneurs, as well, because they can’t prove their income as well, so we’re looking at our own policies to try and make sure that there is more equity in our mortgage insurance programs,” he said.
Anyone who wants to buy a home in Canada without a down payment of at least 20 per cent of the purchase price is usually required to get mortgage loan insurance from the CMHC, which requires a smaller down payment of five per cent on a home worth up to $500,000…

Continue Reading On moneysense.ca »

Bring back the $10,000 TFSAFederal Finance Minister Bill Morneau, left, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (Jake Wright/CP)
For those who pay attention to what politicians are up to on taxes, consider that since 2015, the focus has mostly been on raising them. From Atlantic Canada to Alberta, British Columbia and federally, new brackets were invented and other rates raised; in addition, new and higher taxes are yet to come including a federal carbon tax.
Even the new Progressive Conservative government of Brian Pallister in Manitoba, elected last year on opposition to a sales tax increase by the previous government, is toying with new taxes, including a carbon tax and higher taxes on insurance products.
One rare exception to this flurry of higher tax activity was in 2016 when the federal government dropped the rate for one middle income bracket, to 20.5 per cent from 22 per cent.
Middle-class Canada takes a hit
Regrettably, as the Fraser Institute discovered last week, that change wasn’t enough to offset the removal of many boutique tax credits…

Continue Reading On macleans.ca »

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